Hot off the press: what does Careers Guidance 2018 mean for schools?

with No Comments

On 5 January the Department for Education published new statutory Careers guidance and access for education and training providers. This outlines the actions to be carried out between 2018-20 to “build a world class careers system”, as set out in its December 2017 Careers strategy: making the most of everyone’s skills and talents.

The main points include:

  • All secondary schools should use the Gatsby Foundation Benchmarks to develop and improve their careers provision, with expectation schools begin to work towards the Benchmarks now and meet them by the end of 2020. The Benchmarks are:
  1. A stable careers programme
  2. Learning from career and labour market information
  3. Addressing the needs of each student
  4. Linking curriculum learning to careers
  5. Encounters with employers and employees
  6. Experiences of workplaces
  7. Encounters with further and higher education
  8. Personal guidance
  • The existing duty to secure independent careers guidance is supplanted by a new duty to provide opportunities to a range of providers of technical education and apprenticeships to access pupils to inform them about technical education qualifications or apprenticeships.
  • Schools should use the Careers and Enterprise Company’s free online self-evaluation Compass tool to assess how their careers support compares against the Gatsby Benchmarks and the national average.
  • The Careers and Enterprise Company (CEC) – whose work is carried out locally by Bucks Skills Hub – will take on a more ambitious role by coordinating support for schools across all of the Gatsby Benchmarks.
  • From September 2018, every school will need a Careers Leader who “has energy and commitment and backing from their senior leadership team”.
  • Also from September 2018, every school will be expected to publish details of their careers programme for young people and their parents.
  • Careers guidance will continue to be considered during Ofsted inspection. Published education destination measures are becoming an established part of the accountability system.

The requirements and expectations of schools are:

Timing

Action

Ongoing (legal duty came into force in September 2012)

  • Every school must ensure that pupils are provided with independent careers guidance from year 8 to year 13.

From January 2018 (legal duty came into force on 2 January 2018)

  • Every school must ensure that there is an opportunity for a range of education and training providers to access all pupils in year 8 to year 13 for the purpose of informing them about approved technical education qualifications or apprenticeships.
  • Every school must publish a policy statement setting out their arrangements for provider access and ensure that it is followed.

From January 2018 to end 2020

  • Every school should begin using the Gatsby Benchmarks to improve careers provision now, and meet them by the end of 2020.
  • For the employer encounters Benchmark, every school should begin to offer every young person seven encounters with employers – at least one each year from year 7 to year 13 – and meet this in full by the end of 2020. Some of these encounters should be with STEM employers.

From September 2018

  • Every school should appoint a named person to the role of Careers Leader to lead the careers programme.

From September 2018

  • Every school will be expected to publish details of their careers programme for young people and their parents.